Details

The Complete CD Guide to the Universe


The Complete CD Guide to the Universe


The Patrick Moore Practical Astronomy Series

von: Richard Harshaw

32,12 €

Verlag: Springer
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 06.09.2007
ISBN/EAN: 9780387468952
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 120

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Beschreibungen

This is the largest and most comprehensive atlas of the universe ever created for amateur astronomers. With finder charts of unprecedented detail, in both normal and mirror-image views, and an extensive list of 14,000 objects, it provides a detailed observing guide for almost any practical amateur astronomer, up to the most advanced. Spanning some 3,000 pages, this is a project that is possible only on CD-ROM. The CD-R pages are extensively indexed and referenced for quick location of objects. The accompanying book gives an introduction to the Atlas, showcases the maps, describes the CD-R content and organization, and includes various appendices.
This is the largest and most comprehensive atlas of the universe ever created for amateur astronomers. It provides a detailed observing guide for almost any practical amateur astronomer. Spanning some 3,000 pages, this is a project that is possible only on CD-ROM.
This is without doubt the largest and most comprehensive atlas of the universe ever created for amateur astronomers. It is the first major observing guide for amateurs since Burnham’s Celestial Handbook. With finder charts of large-scale and unprecedented detail, in both normal and mirror-image views (for users of the ubiquitous Meade and Celestron Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope ranges), and an extensive list of 14,000 objects, it will provide a detailed observing guide for almost any practical amateur astronomer, up to the most advanced.Spanning some 3,000 pages, this is a project that is possible only on CD-ROM.The atlas covers the whole range of objects viewable by amateur astronomers with 8- to 11-inch telescopes, from latitude approx +40 degrees.  The projected total number of objects is (currently) 13,238, compared with Burnham’s approximately 5,000 double stars (in three volumes). This is much more than just a catalog of objects.As planned, the atlas will have about 270 double star images and sketches, and 590 or so deep-sky images and sketches. Comparisons with other atlases are invidious, but Tirion’s atlas and Uranometria, for example, don’t go as deep in magnitude and the scale is unsuitable for "star hopping" in the eyepiece—where the action REALLY takes place.  The charts in the Complete CD Atlas of the Universe and the scale they are on, allow the user to get enough detail to easily find the objects described. In addition mirror-image charts are supplied for instruments with reverse fields (all SCTs).This is also much more than ‘planetarium’ software. Many planetarium programs do not have good object databases, and those that do have databases that are too large for practical field use.  For example, TheSky, one of the most popular (and best) programs, can display the entire Washington Double Star Catalog (some 120,000 doubles!), but 90% of these are not resolvable (or even viewable from certain horizons), and there is no way to determine that by looking at the screen.  The result is that there are more objects plotted on the screen than you can actually see, and the clutter makes it very hard to find what you want.The CD-R pages are extensively indexed and referenced for quick location of objects, areas, classes of objects etc..The accompanying book gives an introduction to the Atlas, showcases the maps (thus buyers can see what they are getting without running the CD-R), describes the CD-R content and organization, and includes various appendices.
First Light.- Astronomical Mechanics.- Seeing Beyond the Obvious.- Double Stars Galore!.- Deep-Sky Objects.- Framing the Picture.- Maps and Zones.- Kudos to the Guilty.- How to Use the CD-ROM.
Richard Harshaw lives in Kansas, where he works as a consultant. During his 40 years of practical observing, (seventeen of them with large-aperture instruments) he has received eight Astronomical League observing awards, and has published measurements of approximately 1,600 double stars.His many published papers include Third Degree Views (The Webb Society’s Deep Sky Observer, No. 121, Summer 2000); Color in Double Stars (Deep Sky Observer, No. 116, April 1999); An Investigation Into Discrepancies In the Washington Double Star Catalog (Deep Sky Observer, No. 129); On Double Identities, Recovered Pairs, and Optical Imposters in the Washington Double Star Catalog (Webb Society Double Star Section Circular No. 12, 2004); New Measures for Some ‘Neglected’ Double Stars of the Washington Double Star Catalog (Double Star Section Circular No. 12, 2004); Possible Quadrant Reversals in the WDS Catalog 2001.0 (Double Star Section Circular No. 11, 2003).
This guide contains descriptions and charts for a total of almost 14,000 objects, and is probably the largest and most comprehensive Atlas of the Universe ever created for amateur astronomers.Spanning some 13,000 pages, this is a project that is possible only with Springer Extras.The atlas covers the whole range of objects viewable by amateur astronomers with 8 - to 11-inch telescopes, north of about latitude +40 degrees. Everything described here can be observed from suburban sites. Large-scale finder charts - in both normal and mirror-image "SCT" views - along with the extensive list of 14,000 objects provide a detailed observing guide for almost any practical amateur astronomer.Around 10,750 of the objects are double or multiple stars; the remaining 3000 or so represent the other classes of deep-sky objects. Double stars dominate this work for two reasons. First, for telescopes of modest aperture they are by far the most numerous type of object and second, double stars are usually bright enough to be easily observed from urban sites. The other deep-sky objects include many galaxies (1573 of them), and although dark-sky sites are of course best, many of these can be seen in skies that most amateurs would write off as hopeless for the task. There are 580 open clusters, 109 globular clusters, 148 planetary nebulae, plus a few others.The Complete CD Atlas of the Universe is a resource that could easily provide the basis of a whole lifetime of observing!
Large-scale and very detailed finder charts for every part of the sky, from –40° declination to the North Celestial Pole in both normal and mirror image views, let the observer find things just as they appear in his telescopeExtensive catalog of 14,000 objects, including double stars, nebulae, planetary nebulae, open clusters, globular clusters, galaxies, etc. Plenty to observe for years and yearsDetailed descriptions of the author’s observations of hundreds of objects, and observing reports from various amateurs are included. Readers can have confidence that these objects really have been observed with an amateur telescope instrument of 8 inches or largerExtensive historical data on important objects in the catalog. Helps build an understanding of the development of modern astronomy and man’s awareness of the vastness of the cosmosExtensive double star measurement histories are included for most of the double stars. This helps show when pairs are in rapid displacement so the observer can be ready to adjust for separations and position angles
This is the largest and most comprehensive atlas of the universe ever created for amateur astronomers. It is the first major observing guide for amateurs since Burnham’s Celestial Handbook. With finder charts of large-scale and unprecedented detail, in both normal and mirror-image views, and an extensive list of 14,000 objects, it provides a detailed observing guide for almost any practical amateur astronomer, up to the most advanced. The atlas has about 270 double star images and sketches, and 590 or so deep-sky images and sketches. Spanning some 3,000 pages, this is a project that is possible only on CD-ROM. The CD-R pages are extensively indexed and referenced for quick location of objects, areas, classes of objects etc. The accompanying book gives an introduction to the Atlas, showcases the maps (thus buyers can see what they are getting without running the CD-R), describes the CD-R content and organization, and includes various appendices. This is much more than just a catalog of objects.

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